PHOTO PRINTS AND DOCUMENTS RESOLUTION TABLE
Original
Size
Scanned
DPI
Max
Enlargement
JPEG
File size
TIFF
File Size
# of files on a CD
JPEG/TIFF
# of files on a DVD
JPEG/TIFF
1" x 1.5"
400
2" x 3"
.2 MB
.7 MB
3,090/882
22,325/6,378
2.25" x 2.25"
400
4.5" x 4.5"
.4 MB
2.3 MB
1,545/268
11,162/1,941
3" x 5"
400
6" x 10"
.8 MB
6.9 MB
772/80
5,581/647
4" x 6"
400
8" x 12"
1.1 MB
11 MB
380/56
4,089/405
5" x 7"
400
10" x 14"
1.4 MB
16 MB
561/38
3,189/279
8" x 10"
400
16" x 20"
3.0 MB
36.6 MB
206/16
1,488/121
11" x 14"
400
22" x 28"
6.4 MB
70.5 MB
96/8
697/63
12" x 18" 400 24" x 36" 7.9 MB 98.9 MB 78/5 565/45
RESOLUTION and FILE FORMATS
We scan all standard sized photo prints and documents at 400dpi, the highest standard resolution in the industry. That's 78% more pixels than a 300dpi scan.

I know that doesn't seem correct, but over one square inch, for instance, (400 pixels x 400 pixels) = 16,000 pixels, and (300 pixels x 300 pixels) = 9,000 pixels, making 400dpi 78% larger than 300dpi. And, our prices are lower!

Most photofinishers (Kodak, Fuji, etc.) recommend 200dpi resolution at output size for color prints.

There are two basic file formats used today: JPEG and TIFF. The JPEG format is a "lossy" format. That means it loses some information each time it's saved. However, when saved at a compression setting that reduces the size of the file to about 10% of the original size, the loss is so small that the human eye cannot perceive it, and so it's become the standard of the photographic industry. You just don't want to open a file in JPEG format and save it over and over using JPEG, because each time you save it, it will lose a little bit more detail. Rather, you should open the JPEG file, make changes to it, and then re-save it in the TIFF format so you don't lose anymore detail.

For purists, the TIFF format is a "lossless" format, meaning it loses nothing each time it's saved. However, it takes up a lot of space on your disk when compared to the JPEG format. We save files in the JPEG format unless instructed otherwise.

The tables below indicate how much larger you can make an original when it's scanned at various resolutions, the file slzes using different file types and the number of images you can store on a CD/DVD when using the various file types.

SLIDES AND FILM RESOLUTION TABLE
Original
Size
Scanned
DPI
Max
Enlargement
JPEG
File size
TIFF
File Size
# of files on a CD
JPEG/TIFF
# of files on a DVD
JPEG/TIFF
35mm 1" x 1.5"
2000
8" x 10"
1.2 MB
17.2 MB
473/35
4,059/259
35mm 1" x 1.5"
3000
15" x 22.5"
2.8 MB
38.6 MB
220/16
1,594/115
35mm 1" x 1.5"
4000
20" x 30"
6.6 MB
68.7 MB
93/9
676/64
2.25" x 2.25"
1000
11.25" x 11.25"
1.2 MB
14.5 MB
515/42
3,720/307
2.25" x 2.25"
2000
22.5" x 22.5"
5.5 MB
57.9 MB
112/10
811/77
2.25" x 2.25"
3000
33.75" x 33.75"
11 MB
130.4 MB
56/4
405/34
2.25" x 2.25"
4000
45" x 45"
19.6 MB
231.7 MB
31/2
227/19